Posts Tagged ‘Fall Recipes for Dogs’

Fall Feasts and Feasting Dogs! Read down for a delicious fall feast recipe for your dog.

Monday, September 24th, 2012

Tulips and daffodils are not good doggy snacks!

Dogs love fall. It’s cooler so they have more energy and the chaos of swirling leaves and gusty cool winds makes dogs feel like running and barking all day long. Or at least that’s how Raja feels.

Now, running in the wind makes a dog hungry and a hungry dog will begin to forage. Just because a dog wants to eat something he finds does not mean that the food is safe. Wild dogs learn the hard way. Your dog has you to sort out the forrage from the fodder.

Acorns:  Pigs, squirrels, chipmunks and deer love them. Dogs should not eat them, but the smell of deer, squirrel and chipmunk in the areas where acorns fall might draw your dog to them. Acorn contain gallotanin. While in lab tests gallotanin has been associated with antioxidation, anti-inflammation, blood lipid and glucose lowering action and anti-aging, acorns are not a good way to ingest gallotanins. Basically, acorns will cause gastric distress and the hard crushed nut material could injure the intestine. So if you see your dog rooting like a truffle pig amid the fallen acorn leaves, haul him out and redirect him to some other more productive.

Tulips:  You guessed it, tulips are considered to be toxic. They contain tulipanin, which is an anthocyanin, which is a water soluble plant pigment, which is present in eggplants and red wine, but which is supposed to be poisonous to dogs. Hmmm, eggplants are OK for dogs, but red wine is not. Squirrels and deer love tulips and seem to thrive on them, as they do after a big meal of acorns.???Look, tulips may attract the gastronomic dog in some way. Just don’t let them eat them. They’re probably not fatal in moderation, but I bet even one will make your dog sick.

Dadodils:  Even deer that are starving won’t eat daffodils. It is unlikely your dog will try to eat them, but if she does, they are very bad news. Pobably the scariest symptom is cardiac arrhythmia. And that’s very scary indeed.

Alliums:  Those gorgeous puffball purple and white spring flowers with the strappy leaves are allium family. They are onion relatives, very toxic to dogs, can cause dangerous anemia and some crazy dogs seem to like raw onions.  Plant them deep and make sure your pup doesn’t dig them up.

You don’t need to worry about these toxic and irritational plant materials unless your dog is a mischievous snacker. Raja won’t eat bulbs and acorns, so avoiding his contact with them is just paranoid.  As for you and your doggy, well, some dogs will try anything at least once, so keep an eye open.

What can your doggy eat in fall?  To support good food in fall and not to seem like two spoil sports, we have created a seasonal, sustainable early fall garden-inspired dinner for your dog.  It’s much tastier than forage- a cooked meal with meat, fruit, vegetables and grain.  Some of you may buy your dog food; some of you may feed raw; some of you may be anti-grain.  Raja and I are not canine nutritionists, but we are canine home cooking enthusiasts.  Do whatever you think best; we’re not doctrinarian… but Raja really loved this seasonal stew made with our own beans and figs:

A seasonal stew with a fall theme...

Cornucopia Lamb Slow Cooker Stew

1 tbsp olive oil

1 lb ground lamb (crumbled in small morsels)

1 medium yam (cut in medium dice)

15 fresh purple Tuscan beans- green are fine too- (cut in one inch dice)

4 ripe figs (quartered)

1 cup faro (rinsed)

3 cups water or onion-and-MSG-free meat or vegetable broth

Coat a slow cooker with the olive oil.  Add all ingredients making sure the liquid covers the faro.  Cook on high for 4 hours or until done.  Cut to desired bite size and serve.  Makes eight ShihTzu- sized portions or three Lab-sized portions.

Readers… what seasonal foods do your dogs like?  Let’s hear your ideas for snacks and meals of the season.